Tuesday, March 1, 2016




Your dreams show you what a genius you really are. Just think about the creativity you need to produce a "vision of the night." The scriptwriter in you thinks up scenes and provides dialogue for each character. Your inner art director creates settings in exquisite detail. Some of these images are more original and fantastic than anything you've seen in science fiction. The producer pulls it all together to deliver messages that need to be told. Try accomplishing these feats with such ease in waking life!

If your own nightly experience doesn't convince you of the genius of dreams, consider this. Throughout history, solutions to difficult problems have been revealed during sleep. One of my favorite examples is that of Elias Howe, who is credited with inventing the sewing machine. Howe was about to give up on ever making his machine work. The thread, which passed through a hole in the blunt top of the needle, kept getting hopelessly tangled. Nothing he tried could keep the thread flowing smoothly.

One night, Howe had a terrifying dream. He was being attacked by a hostile tribe who were closing in on him with spears. Just as the weapons were about to stab his flesh, Howe woke up in a fright. But then he recalled something curious. Each of the spears had a hole in their point. A revelation flashed. The hole in his needle should be moved to the sharp tip! The new design work magnificently, and Howe was always in awe at how a dream showed him the way.


Have you ever awakened from sleep with a solution or revelation that eluded you earlier? A deep part of the psyche works on problems when we go into repose. We can make active use of these gifts by deliberately asking for help from the dream-self.

I say something like, "I don't what to do about [state the situation.] Please work on this issue while I sleep. Give me direction when I awake. Show me the way."  If I don't receive answers immediately in the morning, I hold trust that the process is underway. I expect answers to drift in before long. And rarely am I disappointed.  

The genius that conjures up our dreams has many gifts to offer. It can inspire creativity in our work, give encouragement when we need it most, send healing energies to the body and emotions, and open up whole new worlds of experiencing. This is why the Roman writer, Synesius of Cyrene, reverently called dreams, "Our oracles,...our quiet and unerring counselors."  

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